Archive for Live Free USA News

Coming Soon to Live Free USA

COMING SOON!

In the coming months Live Free USA will be moving forward with several projects and improvements.  The challenges and hazards of the coming years demands that we strengthen our base and expand our membership.  With a larger and more active board of directors we are now able to pursue multiple objectives.

Website Improvement

We are working to creat a more attractive and interactive website with more functions for online members. We also hope to have more activity in the survival medicine, chapter activities, and other specialized pages. We are also exploring ways to offer discounts to members who purchase survival gear through the site.

Chapter and Affiliated Organization Support

One of our directors will function as the Chapter, Affiliate Coordinator, regularly communicating with each chapter and providing support and and involvement.  A Chapter Leaders handbook will be available by early 2020 and maybe a regular Chapter Leaders online newsletter.to follow.

Permanent Survival Training Facility

A land-site in northern Indiana is being developed as a site to conduct advance survival and self-reliance training operations.  This site should be available in early 2020. The site will include campsites, sanitary facilites, a traing building, and a rifle and pistol range. We are seeking donations and pledges to help us make improvements and maintain the facility.

Added Value to Membership

  A members Handbook will be available by the end of 2019.  The book wil include information about Live Free organization and philosophy, but will also containe valuable survival information.   It will be available online free and a printed version will be available at nominal cost.  We may increase membership fees slightly and include the handbook with all new memberships. Other ideas are being considerd to add value to membership.

Expanded Survival Instructors and Programs

  Camp Independence will continue at Tippecanoe River State Park in Indiana, but may be franchised to other locations throughout the USA.  We also plan to revive our Certified Survival Instructors program to develop new instructors and support current instructors.

Opportunities to Get Involved

We currently have two opening for Directors to the Board of Directors.  These posted can be filled by designation by the board untill the next election.  Filling these posts will definitely help us reach the above goals. Additionally the board is authorized to designate Deputy Directors and establish teams to work on projects.  We would welcome hearing from members new and old who want to get involved and active. Since we now use the internet and online meetings it is not necessary for officers to reside in any nearby location.

Camp Independence 2019

Camp Independence Returns to Tippecanoe


Video courtesy of Tracy Apperson of Sparrow Rose Soap

When the State of Indiana closed the Group Camp facilities at Tippecanoe River State Park a few years ago Live Free USA tried a few other locations for our flagship event.  The original Group Camp facility included a large dining hall, an infirmary, instructors lodging, a crafty training building, and thirty-six cabins for participants to stay in. We were unable to find anything comparable for the kind of events we had hosted for over forty-five years.

After a few challenging efforts at other sites, we decided to try using the remaining Tepicon Hall back at Tippecanoe.  We were delighted to find that the hall had been remodeled and upgraded.  Attendees who wanted to stay overnight were able to rent the nice Rent-A-Camp cabins or reserve campsites in the park through the Indiana DNR website.  Although Tepicon has is a bit smaller hall, we were able to accommodate everyone nicely and used the adjoining outdoor areas to conduct concurrent classes.

We again were able to provide breakfast, lunch, and dinner at a nominal cost to all in attendance. In addition to a full schedule of classes, we sold books, recruited members and conducted raffles with great survival gear and training prizes contributed by local vendors and generous members.   Members pitched in manning tables, serving meals, and cleaning up the facilities. The enthusiasm and camaraderie was at a level not seen in several years. Classes included: food preservation, gardening, beekeeping, fire starting, survival for children, field navigation, first aid, drone uses, survival packs, radio communications, knife sharpening, and more. Needless to say, Camp Independence will be back at Tippecanoe next-year and in years to come.  Watch this publication and our website and Facebook pages for the dates.  We are already looking for instructors and helpers for that event.

A full hall of participants listen to one of many instructors throughout the day

Schedule of indoor and outdoor classes

Instructors used multi-media, hands-on and demonstrations

Th outdoor area was used for fire starting, navigation and other subjects

Tables filled with items for the Survival Stuff raffle

Comfortable cabins and space for family activities were available from the Indiana DNR

Two Live Free Chapters in Tennessee

Two Live Free Chapters in Tennessee
We are happy to welcome the “Tennessee Scouts” Live Free USA chapter to our family. This chapter is located in Silver Point TN east of Nashville. They are planning on doing regular meetings and camp events in the near future. They join the established “Middle Tennessee” chapter near Nashville as Live Free’s presence grows throughout the state. We invite members in Tennessee to contact the Tennessee Scouts at: thebeals@twlakes.net and the Middle Tennessee Chapter at galloyd@mttkd.com

Northwest Chicago Group Revival!

The leader of the Northwest Chicago Area Live Free Chapter moved away a while back and no-one stepped up to replace him.  As a result the group has been inactive (but not forgotten) for many months.  We now have a few folks restarting things in that area and we look forward to a resumption of the great meetings and classes that were previously held.  Live Free has considerable resources to boost this effort.  If you would like to be included in the new Northwest Chicago Live Free programs and help get it going contact:  oldnamvet0@gmail.com or call: 815-814-0336

 

FREE SAMPLE COPY OF AMERICAN SURVIVOR!

Many of you who visit our site are not yet members.  While we do post many survival and self-reliance articles here, most of our best information is reserved for publication in the members only sections. In addition to the Survival Papers and many other items, our member get a PDF downloadable issue of American Survivor bimonthly.  This is America's oldest continuously published survival newsletter.  Each issue is loaded with survival information you will not see anywhere else.  In addition members joining on-line through PayPal can download scores of back issues at no additional cost. Enjoy and join.

Just click on the link below to get a PDF sample copy of American Survivor

AmericanSurvivorSPECIAL,3-15-1

The Political Effects of Self-Reliance

THE POLITICAL EFFECTS OF
THE SELF-RELIANCE MOVEMENT

By James C. Jones, President of Live Free USA

I am often asked why Live Free is not involved more in political activities. After all, “Live Fee” implies a political imperative and philosophy far more than a name with Prepper or Survival in it. My first answer is that there are plenty of great conservative political organizations out there fighting for gun rights and other issues and we often find ourselves working with such organizations to help their members achieve greater functional independence. Our activities are often mutually beneficial and supportive. Live Free’s mission is to advocate, promote, educate and support individual and family preparedness and self-reliance. That is an important and unique mission. Getting involved in political action would simply drift us off message and off mission. Paradoxically, my second answer is that Live Free.s mission is more politically effective than any voting,

SEE THE FULL ARTICLE UNDER THE ARTICLES SECTION

I have gotten a lot of favorable comments on this article published in American Survivor so I have added the full article to the "Articles" section of the website.

THOUGHTS FROM ALASKA

Thoughts from Alaska


I finally got around to seeing Alaska. Simply put: you should not leave this life without seeing this beautiful l and unique place. My limited time and budget allowed me to visit only a few locations, but I would like to share my observations with you. My visit was in late July and covered the south coastal area near Anchorage, the Denali National Park and the interior around Fairbanks. I experienced the cold in the glacial fiords, and the rather mild temperatures of the interior. I was fortunate to talk to members of indigenous tribes, long-time residents and transient residents as well. Anchorage is a pretty typical small city with a skyline and plenty of urban refinements. Fairbanks is a rougher sort of modern frontier town. Remember that they are over 300-miles apart with no other populated areas or road networks for a thousand miles. This is a unique environment! I will not dwell on the glaciers, mountains, boat trips and rail road’s trains. Instead, I will focus on the items that may be of interest to all of you self-reliance and survival types out there.
Less heat means less atmospheric energy and this results in less wind. Thunderstorms, tornadoes and high winds are far less frequent in a perpetually cool environment so wind power is not effective. Solar panels are common. Because of the low angle of the sun, they are set almost vertically. The extra-long summer days provide direct solar energy throughout at least 6-months. Propane seems to be the preferred fuel source in winter, supplemented with wood.
The Japanese current in the ocean modifies the climate in the Anchorage area so that it’s rather chilly in summer (like Seattle) but milder than the interior in winter. In fact, it’s only about 10 degrees colder than Chicago (on average) with fewer days of snow. However, in the fiords of Prince William Sound they are cold all the time and get 70-feet (yes feet) of snow. Everyone in Whittier lives in one building and the kids use a tunnel to get to school.
While the summer is short, the long days accelerate growing so that huge vegetables and grain crops provide most of Alaska’s needs in a few months. Most families get about 80% of their protean from fishing and hunting. Virtually everyone fishes and hunts. Refrigeration is no problem with a six month winter and permafrost just a few feet below. While down in the lower 48-states we recommend that people stock up to be isolated for 4-6 months this is normal procedure for many Alaskans
Out in the suburbs and rural areas water supplies are an issue. If you have a stream it freezes in winter and you need to use an axe and stove to get water. Wells and piped water are going to freeze. If you have a dry cabin (with no stream) you go into town with a tank in the back of your pickup truck and buy water for home use. I observed many trucks with 200 gallon tote-tanks on the roads.
The Athabaskan Indians are the largest tribe in the interior. They retain many of their traditions, but have adopted plenty of modern conveniences as well. Spread out over millions of square miles of tundra and wilderness it is challenging for them to get an education. The children come to the towns in summer and homeschool in winter. I found them to be intelligent and friendly people. As I suspected (and teach) these folks survive the extreme cold by eating calories and staying insulated, not by building big fires. Clothing and food are their primary survival methods, with fire as a temporary and auxiliary method. There is plenty of fur available to the natives, but otter fur is the most effective. There is more fur on one-inch of otter pelt than on an entire German Sheppard. Mink was generally used only for cabin insulation until they found that they could sell it
Alaska is true wilderness. At the end of the one lane gravel road into Denali National Park you can walk on for over 400-miles without encountering a single sign of human existence. A bear (we saw lots of them) can be born and live out its entire life without ever encountering a human being. There are still folks who live in cabins with no trail or roads for access. They get supplies by bush-pilot plans or whistle stop trains.
I was surprised to note that the mix of “normal” cars and 4-whell drive vehicles was about the same as in Indiana. Some people have a summer car and a winter truck. While there were plenty of hanging baskets of flowers, there was not much attention to lawns or fancy flower beds. Not many BBQ grills or patios either. Summer is just too short for such things. They do embrace the winter with all kinds of games and festivals. Since many areas are only accessible by aircraft landing on ice, water or tundra strips. The older more durable airframes are in great demand. In addition to the ubiquitous DC 3s , Pipers and Cessnas’ I observed some 1940s and 50s vintage Lockheed and Boing prop planes.
People who live in Alaska, love Alaska. They are freer and more self-reliant by choice and necessity. While the lower 48 needs Alaska for it gold (still lots up there), oil and salmon, Alaska is pretty much self-sufficient. I felt rather at home there.

Enhanced Optics for Survival

Two Binoculars and a Monoculare

Two Binoculars and a Monoculare

Multiplying Your Survival Choices with Binoculars in Your Pack

One item that is often left out of the survival pack is optical enhancement (binoculars or monocular). Fortunately, today there is a full range of reasonably priced, durable and functional optics. Many years ago the only good binoculars were large, bulks and delicate. On my very limited budget, I had a cheap pair of toy binoculars in my pack. Sure they were junk, but still much better than my one-power eyeballs. I am not an expert on binoculars, but unless you have unlimited fund, buying a pair of Zeiss Terra EDs at $500.00 seems excessive when you can get the same level of magnification and field for less than $100.00 and use the other $400.00 for other survival needs.
I do have a large pair of binoculars at home that I bought in the 1960s. These 20x50 optics are good for home situations (not to mention astronomy), but too bulky for the pack. In compliance with my own “not what you have, but what you have with you” rule I have a small pair of 10x25 binoculars that I carry in my truck (along with my Emergency Response Guidebook) for road situations. I carry a slightly larger pair of 16x32 Bushnell’s that I keep with my pack in their belt pouch. When traveling light I have a small 8x21 monocular. This cheap, lightweight monocular actually is faster to use and spot with than the larger binoculars. I took the Bushnell’s on a recent trip to Alaska. It’s a good idea to see a grizzly bear 16-times sooner than he sees you!
My point is that enhanced optics provides you with an advantage that fully justifies the allocation of funds, weight and space. Knowing what’s around you at a distance gives you choices that you may not have when you get closer. “I didn’t see that coming” can be your last words! For example:

• On the road you can see roadblocks, violence, hazardous materials, washouts and other hazards well before you encounter them. You can chose how to avoid or deal with these issues

• In camp or at home you can identify friend or foe, approaching looters, etc. before you are seen. Then you can prepare to defended or retreat as necessary.

• You can spot safe routs, safe camp sites, useful supplies, game, water sources and other needs many times further out than with the unaided eye.
These are significant advantages! Unless you like to miss opportunities and you like surprises, you need to include enhanced optics as part of your survival equipment.

Binoculars were a must have in Alaska

Binoculars were a must have in Alaska

SURVIVAL SHOVELS

Survival Shovels

Very small folding shovel for survival packs.

Very small folding shovel for survival packs.

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A shovel is one of the items that is often left out of the bug-out-bag, but should be included if at all possible.

When I was a kid just after World War Two every kid in the neighborhood had an “Army Shovel”.  These were childproof and child sized digging tools.  The result was that every vacant lot was a warren of trenches and underground tunnels. Unfortunately a few kids did get killed in cave-ins.

The shovel of the static trench warfare of World War One was the M-1910.  This was just a small “T” handled spade.   World War Two was a more mobile operation requiring the soldier to dig quickly in any kind of soil and then move and dig again.  The M1943 folding shovel was strong enough to dig in frozen and rocky soil and included a pick to chop and pry. It was a bit heavy, but troops were generally trucked for long distances. This was the shovel that somehow came home after the war and fell into the hands of the baby-boomer children.  The very similar M-1951 served through the Korean War and Vietnam.  There were and still are a wide variety of commercially made imitations of this well designed tool.  The tri-folding shovel with its triangular grip handle came into use late in the Vietnam conflict.  It is a much more compact and lightweight tool than the M-1951, but a bit less capable.

Shovels have somewhat limited use in urban areas where an axe or pry bar may be of more help, but they are a must once the brick and concrete are left behind.  Uses include: digging shelters, digging fire pits, burying waste, drainage trenching, building defensive positions, and making animal traps. There may be the need to clear ground and shovel snow for cold weather camps as well.

There are a variety of small “camp shovels” on the market.  Your choice depends on how much weight you can add to your survival pack.  The two main designs are miniaturized version of the old M-1951 and the current tri-fold designs.  If you are really pressed for space and weight, a good quality garden trowel gives you at least some digging capacity.  Of course you may want a bigger shovel in your vehicle or survival cache.

 

Home Freez-Drying Machine

In Home Freeze Dryer

    At a recent preparedness expo I observed a demonstration of an “in home” freeze drying machine.  Up until now, freeze-drying was been the one food preservation option not available to most preppers.  We can dehydrated, smoke, pickle, cure and can, but we have to pay a high price for freeze-dried foods.  Freeze-dried survival foods are by fare the lightest weight and longest lasting of all survival food supplies, but are also the costliest.  A dollar’s worth of beef stew can cost from $6.00 to $8.00 in a freeze-dried package.   Purchasing a six-month or one-year food stock of freeze-dried is a considerable investment.

The Harvestright ™ freeze-drying machine is about the size of a vey large microwave.  The machine freezes the foods down to around 40 below zero and then vacuums away all of the moisture content.  Finally the food is vacuum-sealed  in oxygen and moisture proof packages.  The manufacturer claims that 97% of the nutritional value of the food is preserved with a shelf life of over 25-years. 

At this point the machine sells for a hefty $4,000.00.  You would save about $5.00 to $6.00 per freeze-dried meal so you would need to do about 600 to 800 meals to pay off the machine.  This may not be cost effective for a person or family, but could be a good business investment or cooperative purchase for a survival/preparedness group.  Cost may come down some, but the need for the refrigeration, dehydration and vacuum systems will probably sustain prices well above $1,000.00 for years to come.

   For more information go to:  Harvestright.com or call 1-800-923=4673.

 

Home Freez-Dry machine demo.

Home Freez-Dry machine demo.